Managing the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa: Policies, Incentives and Options for the Rural Poor

Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 57–73, January 2010

17 Pages Posted: 9 Jun 2010 Last revised: 17 Jun 2010

See all articles by Peter A. Dewees

Peter A. Dewees

Agriculture and Rural Development Department, World Bank

Bruce Campbell

CGIAR

Yemi Katerere

United Nations - UN-REDD Programme

Almeida Sitoe

Eduardo Mondlane University (UEM) - Faculty of Agronomy and Forestry, Department of Forestry

A. Cunningham

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Arild Angelsen

CIFOR, Center for International Forestry Research, Cameroon; Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) - Department of Economics and Resource Management

Sven Wunder

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

Date Written: January 1, 2010

Abstract

Miombo woodlands cover vast areas of southern Africa. Of comparatively little interest for export-oriented commercial logging, they are part of a complex system of rural land use that integrates woodland management with crops and livestock. There is also evidence that woodland resources are extensively used for household consumption, greatly reducing the risk of households falling deeper into poverty as a result of environmental or economic stress. New opportunities for improving the management of miombo woodlands, with poverty mitigation in mind, suggest four policy options. First, communities are becoming more active in managing local natural resources, a result of decentralization and land reforms, which suggests that there may be good scope for strengthening related policy and legal frameworks and the measures to implement them. Second, new and integrated conservation-development approaches are emerging, which suggests possible scope for providing payments for environmental services to increase the value of managed woodlands. Third, markets throughout the region are developing and expanding, which suggests great scope for enhancing forest-based markets by removing restrictive legislation and by supporting local producers and forest enterprises. Fourth, all these opportunities suggest that public forest institutions can be revitalized by strengthening their service delivery orientations, with poverty mitigation as a main objective.

Keywords: dry woodlands, miombo, poverty, policy

JEL Classification: D61, E61, N57, Q23

Suggested Citation

Dewees, Peter A. and Campbell, Bruce and Katerere, Yemi and Sitoe, Almeida and Cunningham, A. and Angelsen, Arild and Wunder, Sven, Managing the Miombo Woodlands of Southern Africa: Policies, Incentives and Options for the Rural Poor (January 1, 2010). Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp. 57–73, January 2010 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1622164

Peter A. Dewees (Contact Author)

Agriculture and Rural Development Department, World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Bruce Campbell

CGIAR ( email )

Washington, DC
United States

Yemi Katerere

United Nations - UN-REDD Programme ( email )

Geneva
Switzerland

Almeida Sitoe

Eduardo Mondlane University (UEM) - Faculty of Agronomy and Forestry, Department of Forestry ( email )

Maputo
Mozambique

A. Cunningham

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

No Address Available

Arild Angelsen

CIFOR, Center for International Forestry Research, Cameroon ( email )

IITA Humid Forest Station
B.P. 2008
Yaounde
Cameroon

Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU) - Department of Economics and Resource Management ( email )

PO Box 5033
NO-1432 Aas
Norway

Sven Wunder

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) ( email )

P.O.Box 6596
JKPWB Jakarta 10065
Indonesia
+62 251 622622, ext. 414 (Phone)
+62 251 622100 (Fax)

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