The Determinants of Food Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World

32 Pages Posted: 18 Dec 2010 Last revised: 22 May 2022

See all articles by Nathan Nunn

Nathan Nunn

Harvard University - Department of Economics

Nancy Qian

Yale University - Department of Economics

Date Written: December 2010

Abstract

We examine the supply-side and demand-side determinants of global bilateral food aid shipments between 1971 and 2008. First, we find that domestic food production in developing countries is negatively correlated with subsequent food aid receipts, suggesting that food aid receipt is partly driven by local food shortages. Interestingly, food aid from some of the largest donors is the least responsive to production shocks in recipient countries. Second, we show that U.S. food aid is partly driven by domestic production surpluses, whereas former colonial ties are an important determinant for European countries. Third, amongst recipients, former colonial ties are especially important for African countries. Finally, aid flows to countries with former colonial ties are less responsive to recipient production, especially for African countries.

Suggested Citation

Nunn, Nathan and Qian, Nancy, The Determinants of Food Aid Provisions to Africa and the Developing World (December 2010). NBER Working Paper No. w16610, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1727091

Nathan Nunn (Contact Author)

Harvard University - Department of Economics ( email )

Littauer Center
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Nancy Qian

Yale University - Department of Economics ( email )

28 Hillhouse Ave
New Haven, CT 06520-8268
United States

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