Trees in Managed Landscapes: Factors in Farmer Decision Making

AGRICULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS, pp. 277-294, L.E. Buck, J.P. Lassoie, E.C.M. Fernandes, eds., CRC Press, 1999

12 Pages Posted: 23 Jan 2011

See all articles by J.E. Michael Arnold

J.E. Michael Arnold

University of Oxford

Peter A. Dewees

Agriculture and Rural Development Department, World Bank

Date Written: 1999

Abstract

The presence of trees in contemporary farming systems has its origins in two attributes of trees. One is their role in sustaining crop production and their impacts on the physical environment, most notably through the restoration of nutrients and energy, and protection against damage from wind and water. The other is the role various tree products play in the household economy. This includes products directly used by rural households as food, fuel, construction materials, etc., inputs to agriculture such as fodder, mulch and raw materials for making agricultural implements and storage structures; and products or activities that provide household members with employment and income. The presence or absence of trees also may have a role in securing or maintaining rights of use or tenure. Simple visual observation discloses that today, there are few farming systems which do not incorporate trees in some fashion or another.

Until recently, tree resources in rural landscapes have been largely ignored. In comparison with what is known about the crop and livestock components of agriculture, very little is known about existing tree management practices, about farmers' perceptions of the value of trees and of different tree outputs in meeting their needs and production objectives, and about the constraints farmers face that limit their potential to develop tree resources within their farming system. Programs to stimulate tree management at this level have been severely hindered by this lack of knowledge.

This paper presents results of recent research and analysis undertaken to address some of these gaps in knowledge. The analysis moves away from the needs-based approach that dominated much earlier work on the subject, and instead examines tree management in terms of farmer livelihood strategies and of the dynamics of rural change. It draws, in particular, on a number o detailed case studies of situations in eastern Africa and south Asia.

Keywords: agroforestry, trees, rural agriculture, landscapes

JEL Classification: N57, Q12, Q23, Q00

Suggested Citation

Arnold, J.E. Michael and Dewees, Peter A., Trees in Managed Landscapes: Factors in Farmer Decision Making (1999). AGRICULTURE IN SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS, pp. 277-294, L.E. Buck, J.P. Lassoie, E.C.M. Fernandes, eds., CRC Press, 1999, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1745182

J.E. Michael Arnold

University of Oxford ( email )

Mansfield Road
Oxford, Oxfordshire OX1 4AU
United Kingdom

Peter A. Dewees (Contact Author)

Agriculture and Rural Development Department, World Bank ( email )

1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20433
United States

Do you want regular updates from SSRN on Twitter?

Paper statistics

Downloads
81
Abstract Views
620
rank
404,267
PlumX Metrics