Measuring and Explaining Changes in REIT Liquidity: Moving Beyond the Bid/Ask Spread

Posted: 16 Sep 1999

See all articles by Jim Clayton

Jim Clayton

University of Connecticut School of Business; Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers

Greg H. MacKinnon

Saint Mary's University, Canada - Department of Finance, Information Systems & Management Science

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Abstract

This paper investigates changes in REIT liquidity since the REIT boom of 1993. We use trade by trade data for REITs traded on the major U.S. exchanges to estimate and compare Kyle's (1985) measure of inverse liquidity for the 1993 and 1996 time periods. For our full sample of equity REITs, there is a significant increase in REIT liquidity in terms of the median price impact of trades. The increasing importance of the "self-advised/self-managed" organizational structure is found to be a major factor driving increased REIT liquidity. Our results imply a decline in the asymmetric information faced by market makers. Our investigation of the changes in the size distribution and resulting price impacts of REIT trades over the 1993-1996 period yields evidence of increased importance of informed traders to REIT price dynamics. Our findings of increased liquidity indicate that the increase in adverse selection costs due to the presence of more informed traders is more than offset by the increase in market thickness as a result of an increase in the number of uninformed (liquidity) traders.

JEL Classification: G12

Suggested Citation

Clayton, James F. and MacKinnon, Greg H., Measuring and Explaining Changes in REIT Liquidity: Moving Beyond the Bid/Ask Spread. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=175148

James F. Clayton (Contact Author)

University of Connecticut School of Business ( email )

Storrs, CT

Cornerstone Real Estate Advisers ( email )

One Financial Plaza, Suite 1700
Hartford, CT 06103
United States

Greg H. MacKinnon

Saint Mary's University, Canada - Department of Finance, Information Systems & Management Science ( email )

Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 B3H 3C3
Canada
902-420-5730 (Phone)
902-496-8101 (Fax)

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