Non-Cognitive Skills and Personality Traits: Labour Market Relevance and Their Development in Education & Training Systems

46 Pages Posted: 6 Jun 2011

See all articles by Giorgio Brunello

Giorgio Brunello

University of Padua - Department of Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research); Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

Martin Schlotter

Bavarian Ministry for Economic Affairs,Infrastructure, Transport an Technology

Abstract

This paper reviews the empirical economic literature on the relative importance of non cognitive skills for school and labour market outcomes, with a focus on Europe. There is evidence that high cognitive test scores are likely to result not only from high cognitive skills but also from high motivation and adequate personality traits. This suggests that part of the contribution of cognitive skills to economic growth could be due to personality traits. Across large parts of the literature, there is consensus that non cognitive skills have important effects both on school attainment and on labour market outcomes. These effects might be as important as the effects of cognitive skills. Less consensus exists on the malleability of non cognitive skills, with some arguing that these skills can be altered until the end of teenage years and others claiming that emotional intelligence can be changed at any age. Most of what economists know about the technology of non cognitive skill formation concerns early educational levels, such as preschools and schools. While it is difficult to argue that all relevant skill formation ends before labour market entry, there is scant evidence on the role of the workplace in the maintenance and development of existing skills. Clearly, more research in this area is needed.

Keywords: non cognitive skills, Europe

JEL Classification: J24

Suggested Citation

Brunello, Giorgio and Schlotter, Martin, Non-Cognitive Skills and Personality Traits: Labour Market Relevance and Their Development in Education & Training Systems. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1858066 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1858066

Giorgio Brunello (Contact Author)

University of Padua - Department of Economics ( email )

via Del Santo 33
35121 Padova
Italy
+39 049 827 4223 (Phone)
+39 049 827 4221 (Fax)

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute for Economic Research)

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Munich, DE-81679
Germany

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

Martin Schlotter

Bavarian Ministry for Economic Affairs,Infrastructure, Transport an Technology ( email )

Prinzregentenstra├če 28
Munich, Bavaria 01069
Germany
+49(0)8921622275 (Phone)

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