The Effects of Intrauterine Malnutrition on Birth and Fertility Outcomes: Evidence from the 1974 Bangladesh Famine

43 Pages Posted: 26 Oct 2013

See all articles by Rey Hernández-Julián

Rey Hernández-Julián

Metropolitan State College of Denver

Hani Mansour

University of Colorado at Denver - Department of Economics

Christina Peters

Metropolitan State University of Denver

Abstract

This paper uses the Bangladesh famine of 1974 as a natural experiment to estimate the impact of intrauterine malnutrition on sex of the child and infant mortality. In addition, we estimate the impact of malnutrition on post-famine pregnancy outcomes. Using the 1996 Matlab Health and Socioeconomic Survey (MHSS), we find that women who were pregnant during the famine were less likely to have male children. Moreover, children who were in utero during the most severe period of the Bangladesh famine were 32 percent more likely to die within one month of birth compared to their siblings who were not in utero during the famine. Finally, controlling for pre-famine fertility, we find that women who were pregnant during the Famine experienced a higher number of stillbirths in the post-Famine years. This increase appears to be driven by an excess number of male stillbirths.

Keywords: malnutrition, infant mortality, fertility

JEL Classification: I15, J13

Suggested Citation

Hernandez-Julian, Rey and Mansour, Hani and Peters, Christina, The Effects of Intrauterine Malnutrition on Birth and Fertility Outcomes: Evidence from the 1974 Bangladesh Famine. IZA Discussion Paper No. 7692, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2345609 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2345609

Rey Hernandez-Julian (Contact Author)

Metropolitan State College of Denver ( email )

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Hani Mansour

University of Colorado at Denver - Department of Economics ( email )

Campus Box 181
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80218
United States

Christina Peters

Metropolitan State University of Denver

Student Success Building
890 Auraria Pkwy #310
Denver, CO 80204
United States

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