Growing Pains: The Integration vs. Specialization Question for Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Other Comprehensive Law Approaches

23 Pages Posted: 5 Jun 2014

See all articles by Susan Swaim Daicoff

Susan Swaim Daicoff

Independent since 2018, current Legal Aid Program Director

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

Therapeutic jurisprudence is by now well-established as a force to be reckoned with in the law. No longer relegated to a law-and-psychology movement, or to an approach relevant only to mental disability law, it has established its efficacy in a variety of areas, including criminal law, family law, employment law, estate planning, immigration law, corporate planning, health law, and general civil disputes. Furthermore, its success heralds the growth of other, emerging movements in the law, such as collaborative law, restorative justice, and other approaches. Thomas Scheff has called these emerging disciplines "vectors." These vectors comprise an overall movement towards law as a healing profession, which I have called a "comprehensive law movement."

Keywords: therapeutic jurisprudence, comprehensive law

Suggested Citation

Daicoff Baskin, Susan Swaim, Growing Pains: The Integration vs. Specialization Question for Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Other Comprehensive Law Approaches (2008). Thomas Jefferson Law Review, Vol 30, 2008, Arizona Summit Law School Research Paper , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=2445562

Susan Swaim Daicoff Baskin (Contact Author)

Independent since 2018, current Legal Aid Program Director ( email )

Phoenix, AZ Arizona 85020
United States
904-534-3411 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.susandaicoff.webs.com

Do you want regular updates from SSRN on Twitter?

Paper statistics

Downloads
52
Abstract Views
482
rank
505,317
PlumX Metrics