Terrorist Group Rivalries and Alliances: Testing Competing Explanations

Studies in Conflict & Terrorism (Forthcoming)

40 Pages Posted: 1 Feb 2018

See all articles by Brian J. Phillips

Brian J. Phillips

University of Essex - Department of Government; Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE) - Division of International Studies

Date Written: January 24, 2018

Abstract

Terrorist group rivalries and alliances have important consequences, but the sources of these relationships are debated. This paper offers a side-by-side examination of correlates of terrorist rivalries and alliances. Global analyses of hundreds of terrorist groups find violent rivalry is associated with drug trafficking, state sponsorship, ethnic motivation, and operating in a civil conflict country. Alliances are associated with territorial control, intermediate membership size, and religious motivation. The idea that alliances are an indicator of weakness does not find much support. When relationships are disaggregated into theoretically-relevant categories (inter-field and intra-field rivalries, and domestic and international alliances), further distinctions appear.

Keywords: terrorism, terrorist groups, rivalry, rivalries, alliances

JEL Classification: D74, H56

Suggested Citation

Phillips, Brian J., Terrorist Group Rivalries and Alliances: Testing Competing Explanations (January 24, 2018). Studies in Conflict & Terrorism (Forthcoming), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3109068

Brian J. Phillips (Contact Author)

University of Essex - Department of Government ( email )

Wivenhoe Park
Colchester CO4 3SQ, CO4 3SQ
United Kingdom

Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE) - Division of International Studies ( email )

Mexico City
Mexico

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