The Interaction between Personality and Health Policy: Empirical Evidence from the UK Smoking Bans

42 Pages Posted: 9 Jun 2020

See all articles by Cecily Josten

Cecily Josten

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

Grace Lordan

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

Abstract

We investigate whether responses to the UK public places smoking ban depend on personality. Drawing on individual level panel data from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) we exploit variation in the timing and location of these bans to establish their overall effect on smoking outcomes, and how this differs by personality. We measure personality using the Big Five personality traits. We are particularly interested in conscientiousness, given the evidence that it is a good proxy for self-control. Overall, we find that a one standard deviation increase in conscientiousness leads to a 1.4 percentage point reduction in the probability of smoking after the ban. Notably, this is the only Big Five personality trait that interacts with the smoking ban. This finding is very robust to different specifications.

Keywords: smoking ban, personality, Five Factor Model, conscientiousness

JEL Classification: C23, D04, I10, I12, I18, H75

Suggested Citation

Josten, Cecily and Lordan, Grace, The Interaction between Personality and Health Policy: Empirical Evidence from the UK Smoking Bans. IZA Discussion Paper No. 13322, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3620637 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3620637

Cecily Josten (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics

United Kingdom

Grace Lordan

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - London School of Economics ( email )

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