Cartels & the Politics of Competition Law Enforcement in Pakistan

7 Pages Posted: 1 Dec 2020

See all articles by Amber Darr

Amber Darr

University of Manchester; University College London - Faculty of Laws

Date Written: August 7, 2020

Abstract

In this article I argue that despite the promise of independence and the arsenal of scope and powers, CCP has, in fact, only fared marginally better than the MCA in achieving its avowed aims and explore this argument by focusing on CCP’s decisions in respect of prohibited agreements under section 4 of the Pakistan Competition Act 2010. To place the discussion in context, I begin by tracing a brief history of competition law in Pakistan, and by outlining CCP’s structure, powers with regard to prohibited agreements, and its composition. I then examine CCP’s key decisions in respect of prohibited agreements and the extent to which CCP has succeeded in enforcing these. I end by outlining factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to CCP, that have most influenced its operations, for better, or, as is the case, for worse.

Keywords: Competition, Pakistan, Enforcement

Suggested Citation

Darr, Amber, Cartels & the Politics of Competition Law Enforcement in Pakistan (August 7, 2020). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3726614 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3726614

Amber Darr (Contact Author)

University of Manchester ( email )

Oxford Road
Manchester, N/A M13 9PL
United Kingdom

University College London - Faculty of Laws ( email )

Gower St
London WC1E OEG, WC1E 6BT
United Kingdom

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