The CO2CRC Otway Shallow CO2 Controlled Release Experiment: Fault Characterization and Leakage Scenarios

10 Pages Posted: 1 Apr 2021 Last revised: 3 Apr 2021

See all articles by Andrew Feitz

Andrew Feitz

Geoscience Australia

Bruce Radke

Eungella

Kwong Soon Chan

CO2CRC Ltd

Ludovic Ricard

CSIRO Energy

Aleks Kalinowski

Geoscience Australia

Liuqi Wang

Geoscience Australia

Eric Tenthorey

Geoscience Australia

Ralf Schaa

University of Adelaide - Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC)

Konstantin Tertyshnikov

Curtin University

Stanislav Glubokovskikh

Curtin University

Ulrike Schacht

University of Adelaide - Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC)

Stephanie Vialle

Curtin University

Brett Harris

Curtin University

Maxim Lebedev

Curtin University

Roman Pevzner

Curtin University

Sasha Ziramov

Curtin University

Milovan Urosevic

Curtin University

Chris Green

Government of the Commonwealth of Australia - CSIRO Energy

Anthony Credoz

TOTAL SA

Jonathan Ennis-King

CSIRO

Date Written: April 1, 2021

Abstract

CO2CRC has made a significant investment into establishing the feasibility of conducting a CO2 injection experiment into a shallow fault. This world-leading experiment, located at the CO2CRC Otway International Test Centre in Victoria, Australia, would seek to improve our understanding of the conditions necessary for CO2 to move vertically up faults. The work undertaken during Phase 2 of the Otway Fault Project confirms the experiment is technically feasible and can be done safely. Two appraisal wells drilled and cored through the shallow Brumbys Fault indicate the fault extends to the base of the upper 2 m thick Hesse Clay layer, which forms the seal to the underlying Port Campbell Limestone aquifer. The fault does not have a defined core but an approximately 6-10 m wide fault cataclastic zone. Permeability within the Port Campbell Limestone is variable, ranging from tens to thousands of millidarcies. The rock strength is low, however, and it is recommended to conduct the experiment at approximately 80 m depth rather than the 40 m originally proposed. This provides more confining pressure and will ensure that the injection pressure does not exceed the fracture pressure. A deeper injection also provides better spatial and timing conditions for geophysical monitoring and tracking of the CO2 plume. Simulations indicate only a small 10 tonne CO2 injection experiment would be required to monitor CO2 migration using geophysical techniques. In addition to providing an opportunity to demonstrate semi-continuous, near real-time monitoring of CO2 migration up a fault, the planned CO2 injection experiment presents a unique opportunity to obtain field measurements on vertical fault permeability. It also provides an opportunity to predict fluid flow and potential metal remobilisation through comprehensive reactive transport modelling, collection and analysis of core post CO2 injection, and evaluate the effectiveness of the modelling versus field observations.

Keywords: Fault; leakage; carbon dioxide; modelling; geological storage; geosequestration

JEL Classification: Q39

Suggested Citation

Feitz, Andrew and Radke, Bruce and Chan, Kwong Soon and Ricard, Ludovic and Kalinowski, Aleks and Wang, Liuqi and Tenthorey, Eric and Schaa, Ralf and Tertyshnikov, Konstantin and Glubokovskikh, Stanislav and Schacht, Ulrike and Vialle, Stephanie and Harris, Brett and Lebedev, Maxim and Pevzner, Roman and Ziramov, Sasha and Urosevic, Milovan and Green, Chris and Credoz, Anthony and Ennis-King, Jonathan, The CO2CRC Otway Shallow CO2 Controlled Release Experiment: Fault Characterization and Leakage Scenarios (April 1, 2021). Proceedings of the 15th Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies Conference 15-18 March 2021, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3817287 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.3817287

Andrew Feitz (Contact Author)

Geoscience Australia ( email )

Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

Bruce Radke

Eungella

908 Farringdon Rd
Braidwood, NSW 2622
Australia

Kwong Soon Chan

CO2CRC Ltd ( email )

11 – 15 Argyle Place South
Carlton
Australia

Ludovic Ricard

CSIRO Energy ( email )

26 Dick Perry Avenue
Kensington, Western Australia 6151
Australia

Aleks Kalinowski

Geoscience Australia ( email )

GPO Box 378
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

Liuqi Wang

Geoscience Australia ( email )

Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

Eric Tenthorey

Geoscience Australia ( email )

Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia

Ralf Schaa

University of Adelaide - Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC)

Adelaide, South Australia 5005
Australia

Konstantin Tertyshnikov

Curtin University

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Stanislav Glubokovskikh

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA 6102
Australia

Ulrike Schacht

University of Adelaide - Cooperative Research Centre for Greenhouse Gas Technologies (CO2CRC) ( email )

Adelaide, South Australia 5005
Australia

Stephanie Vialle

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Brett Harris

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Maxim Lebedev

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Roman Pevzner

Curtin University

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Sasha Ziramov

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA 6102
Australia

Milovan Urosevic

Curtin University ( email )

Kent Street
Bentley
Perth, WA WA 6102
Australia

Chris Green

Government of the Commonwealth of Australia - CSIRO Energy

10 Murray Dwyer Circuit
Mayfield West, New South Wales 2304
Australia

Anthony Credoz

TOTAL SA

av. Larribau
Pau, 64000
France

Jonathan Ennis-King

CSIRO ( email )

Research Way
Clayton, Victoria 3168
Australia

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