Sarbanes-Oxley Act: What Has it Wrought?

3 Pages Posted: 13 Dec 2006

See all articles by Elizabeth K. Keating

Elizabeth K. Keating

Harvard University - John F. Kennedy School of Government

Eli Goldston

Harvard Law School

Date Written: December 2006

Abstract

Teaching Modules are sets of cases, references, and other materials organized around a special theme. While a single case or reading can be illuminating, a set of materials can show you multiple points of view on an issue, the main debates around an issue, or how a case comes to life through supplementary articles from the business press. For faculty members, Teaching Modules are closer to the kinds of integrated assignments that would appear on a course syllabus. We welcome your comments on how you might use the Teaching Modules or ideas for creating or adding to Teaching Modules.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act is the most significant piece of corporate securities legislation since the Securities Act of 1933 and The Securities and Exchange Act of 1934. The Act's requirements are significant and have brought about substantial change in the work and role of auditors and the operations and financial disclosures of publicly traded corporations. However, this change has not been costless.

Suggested Citation

Keating, Elizabeth K. and Goldston, Eli, Sarbanes-Oxley Act: What Has it Wrought? (December 2006). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=951254 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.951254

Elizabeth K. Keating (Contact Author)

Harvard University - John F. Kennedy School of Government ( email )

79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
617-495-9856 (Phone)
617-495-8963 (Fax)

Eli Goldston

Harvard Law School

1575 Massachusetts
Hauser 406
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

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